How Patient Complaints Can Help Your Business | Dental CPA

Dental Accountants

No one likes to see a patient complaint. Unfortunately, you can be the most compassionate dentist with an exemplary team and follow procedures to a T, and still get a few complaints. Our advice: use them as opportunities.

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The complaint may have a kernel of truth or completely baseless; the important takeaway is this: handle with care: about 94 percent of people use online reviews to choose a business; you do not want a complaint to snowball into a bad review. That can quickly lead to a loss of revenue. That is why it is critical to respond to them.

When complaints are brought to your attention, you and your team may feel frustrated, discouraged or annoyed. That is normal. It can also be easy to feel cavalier about a complaint you see as minor. After all, some complaints are objective: the office décor, wait times, or insurance issues that are completely out of your hands.

Handle All Complaints with Respect

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Even concerns that feel trivial or unfair to you should be handled respectfully. That means making the patient feel heard; letting them know that you take the complaint seriously; and promising to look into it. Here are the steps you should take:

Acknowledge and thank your patient for bringing their concerns to you, without judgment: “I appreciate your taking the time to let me know what you experienced.”

Affirm by repeating the complaint back to the patient: “So you’re saying you had to wait 40 minutes for your appointment and no one checked on you. I’m sorry to hear that.”

Commit to taking action to correct the situation, if warranted. “Sometimes things get backed up. I’ll talk to the front desk team to make sure they are letting you know if there’s a delay.”

 Thank them again: “I do thank you for taking the time to let me know what happened. We appreciate that you put your trust in our practice and we’ll do whatever it takes to make sure you are satisfied.”

Follow through on your commitment, you will earn loyalty from that patient. A complaint is an opportunity for you to cement a patient’s trust.

Keep Building Patient Loyalty

Patient loyalty is a fragile thing, so it is essential to maintain it. Loyalty can translate into fewer rescheduled or cancelled appointments, increased case acceptance, and even referrals to friends, family, and social media connections. Over time, handing one complaint correctly can lead to hundreds or even thousands of dollars in revenue. It is also the right thing to do.

However, if patients leave your office feeling that their concerns were not heard, they are unlikely to refer others to you, or worse, complain on online reputation sites and social media.

Satisfied patients help keep your revenue flowing; our firm is there to keep it strong. Call us for all your dental accounting services.

Can One Toxic Employee Spoil Your Practice? | Dental Accountants

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Hiring new employees is time-consuming, stressful, and sometimes expensive. It’s no wonder, then, that many businesses find it more cost-effective and less emotionally taxing to retain employees, even if they turn out to be a negative influence. Enter the devastating effect of the toxic employee. 

Dental offices tend to be small and close-knit, which makes it even more difficult to confront someone about their behavior and let them go. While finding the right fit for your practice can be a challenge, holding onto a toxic team member can be far more costly.

What is a Toxic Employee?

A toxic employee may be a competent worker, or started out that way, and they may be decent people at heart. For whatever reason, however, their actions and attitude become a drag on the workplace culture. See if you recognize these red flags in your practice:

  • Poor attitude: This type of person will exhibit passive-aggressive characteristics. They may agree with a directive on the surface, but accompany it with eye-rolling, exaggerated sighs, sarcastic comments, muttering, complaints, or a confrontational tone.
  •  Dishonesty: Whether blaming others for their own mistakes, refusing to accept responsibility, or outright lies and thefts, this type of toxic employee can harm your bottom line as well as morale – especially if you don’t confront it. 
  • Lack of engagement: This type of employee avoids work, lacks enthusiasm and is lackadaisical toward responsibilities. They are often inattentive at meetings and huddles. 
  • Falling work performance: The toxic employee will not do any more than the bare minimum of what is expected. They appear disinterested in feedback or training and are otherwise unwilling to improve.
  • Bullying behavior: Anyone who intimidates other team members, is disruptive, or otherwise makes others feel uncomfortable, could be a toxic employee. 

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If you recognize any of these indicators, you have two choices. You can give them another chance or let them go. There is almost always an underlying reason for someone’s toxic attitude: The employee may be going through personal turmoil or carrying forth maladaptive behaviors from childhood. Some toxic employees don’t even realize they are behaving in a negative way until someone points it out. 

While practices are often family-like, keep any discussion strictly work-related. Outline your findings in a factual manner and document, if possible. Create an improvement plan and a timeline. Consult labor laws in your state for additional guidance. 

Your second choice is to outright fire the toxic employee. You may have no choice if you have found an issue that puts patients at risk or involves financial malfeasance.   

If you are still on the fence about letting a negative team member go, consider these consequences of keeping a toxic employee.

  • Loss of new patients: If a toxic employee is interacting with potential patients, they are creating a negative image of your business, which can lose hundreds or thousands of dollars in revenue.
  • Loss of existing patients: If they are treated poorly even once, they may choose to take their oral care elsewhere – and they may tell other people.
  • Loss of your best team members: Your best people want to work in a positive environment where they feel supported and appreciated. By tolerating the complaints, bullying, or shoddy work of one toxic person, you risk losing valuable team members.

Don’t compromise your business or your best team members by refusing to fire toxic employees. For more strategies to improve your practice, contact our office.

Schiff Client Update, Friday, January 15, 2021

PPP2 Loans – as a reminder, you will qualify for a PPP2 Loan if your Fee Income is down at least 25% or more for any calendar quarter when comparing 2020 to 2019. Your best chances of meeting this requirement are Q2 2020 vs Q2 2019. If you have not done so, you are welcome to use the attached spreadsheet to perform this computation.

Many clients are asking me – “should I apply for the PPP2 Loan”? I would quickly respond with a  “YES” but, I am also respectful to those of you, that are not interested in a “Government Handout”. Whatever your decision is, I will respect it.

How will the PPP2 Loan work? – the rules will be the same as the PPP1 Loan. You must spend the funds within a 24 week period and the allocation of such is still 60% for Payroll Covered Costs and 40% for Other Covered Costs. The PPP2 Loan will equal 2.5x your average monthly payroll for 2019, the same as PPP1.

PPP1 Loans – When should I file for forgiveness? As you may recall, you have 10 months to file for forgiveness from the end of your 24 Covered Week Period. If your Practice is down by 50% or more in calendar quarter comparison from 2019 to 2020, you will qualify for the ERC – The Employer Retention Credit. If this is the case, you should hold off on filing for Forgiveness of the PPP1 Loan because you will need to SAVE some wages from the PPP1 and use them for the ERC computation. I have built a spreadsheet to support this. It is very very complicated and hard to understand, but I will share it with you this coming Sunday at 12 Noon. I am hoping the Banks will program their Portals to allow such information to be entered with the Banks Computers computing such Credit. Let’s be patient and see what transpires.

HHS Provider Relief Grants – Today ( January 15, 2021), the Portal of the Department of Health & Human Services is supposed to open, to allow us to submit various financial information on how you spent the HHS Provider Relief Grant(s). I am hoping in addition to the actual COVID Expenses incurred, the Department of HHS will allow us to use the loss of Gross Revenue. Let’s wait and see what their Portal calls for. We will address this on Sunday too!

Please reach out to your Schiff Team Member for any Financial Information you may need for any of these Government Programs. We are just an e-mail away!  


Finally, I will be hosting a ZOOM Meeting on these topics, this coming Sunday at 12 Noon. Here is the Zoom Link Info:

Allen Schiff is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Join Zoom Meeting – https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84365302687

Meeting ID: 843 6530 2687

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+13017158592,,84365302687# US (Washington D.C)
+19294362866,,84365302687# US (New York)

Dial by your location

PPP2 Loan Applications are now available!

Many of you have inquired about the PPP2 and the application process for such. Just now, the SBA released the PPP2 application. Please click on the link below:

https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/136/PPP-Second-Draw-Borrower-Application-Form.pdf

Please keep in mind, in order to qualify for this next round of funding (PPP2) you must be able to prove your collections were down by 25% or more for any calendar quarter. You must meet one of the following:

  • For all entities other than those satisfying the conditions set forth below, Applicants must demonstrate that gross receipts in any quarter of 2020 were at least 25% lower than the same quarter of 2019. Alternatively, Applicants may compare annual gross receipts in 2020 with annual gross receipts in 2019; Applicants choosing to use annual gross receipts must enter “Annual” in the 2020 Quarter and Reference Quarter fields and, as required documentation, must submit copies of annual tax forms substantiating the annual gross receipts reduction.
  • For entities not in business during the first and second quarters of 2019 but in operation during the third and fourth quarters of 2019, Applicants must demonstrate that gross receipts in any quarter of 2020 were at least 25% lower than either the third or fourth quarters of 2019.
  • For entities not in business during the first, second, and third quarters of 2019 but in operation during the fourth quarter of 2019, Applicants must demonstrate that gross receipts in any quarter of 2020 were at least 25% lower than the fourth quarter of 2019.
  • For entities not in business during 2019 but in operation on February 15, 2020, Applicants must demonstrate that gross receipts in the second, third, or fourth quarter of 2020 were at least 25% lower than the first quarter of 2020.

Next week, the week of January 11th, the Banks will be opening their portals, so you will be able to apply for PPP2. It is my recommendation, you stay with the Bank that satisfied your PPP1 Loan, for they already have your financial information. If you need a referral for another financial institution, just e mail me.

You must apply for PPP2 by March 31, 2021. I would not wait, if you qualify, for these funds ($284B) are available on a first come , first serve basis!

If you need any financial documents to support your PPP2 loan request (Tax Returns, 941’s 940’s, State Unemployment Forms), please reach out to your Schiff Team Member

Finally, and as a reminder, if you qualify for the 50% reduction, that we spoke about earlier this week, please contact us, so we can help you with the strategy surrounding the maximization of the Employer Retention Credit (ERC). Please do not file for Forgiveness of PPP1, until we have chatted.

Schiff Client Update, December 31, 2020

PPP#1 Loans

  1. Covered Expenses paid with your PPP#1 Loan will now be tax deductible for money already received
  2. PPP#1 funds will not be taxable income, which means the expenses paid with the PPP#1 funds will be tax deductible
  3. The New Tax Bill, that President Trump signed on Sunday, December 27, 2020, repeals the requirement of deducting the EIDL advance from the PPP forgiveness amount
  4. The EIDL advance up to $10,000 per Practice (or $1,000 per Employee), will not have to be repaid.
  5. The New Tax Bill simplifies the forgiveness process on PPP loans of $150,000 or less. (We have yet to see what that new process or form will be). Please wait to apply for forgiveness, for the Banks are still waiting on updated guidance from the SBA and the US Treasury. Please remember, you MUST file for forgiveness, 10 Months after your 24 week period is up. If you do not file for forgiveness, your PPP Loan , will become a two (2) year Loan payable at 1% interest.

PPP#2 – Second Round of Funding

  1. The SBA will have 10 days (after the New Tax Bill is enacted) to establish regulations for the next round of PPP#2 funding. Thus, please keep in mind that the highlights below are terms we anticipate being signed into law; however, the SBA’s regulations may alter this.
  2. $284.5 Billion in funds will be available through the next PPP#2 loans.
  3. Paycheck Protection Program (PPP#2) offered through March 31, 2021.
  4. Is your Practice eligible for the second round of funding (PPP#2)? Businesses with less than 300 employees who have had a 25% or greater reduction in collections (i.e., gross receipts) in any ONE quarter of 2020, when compared to that same quarter of 2019. For example, let’s assume you collected $100,000 in April 2019, $1000,000 in May 2019 and $100,000 in June 2019 for a total of $300,000 for Q2 of 2019. We will need to compare that to the same quarter of 2020 (April, May & June 2020) to determine if you have a reduction of Collections that are 25% or better. I sense most of you will, since you were closed a good portion of Q2 2020. If so, we will then need further guidance from both the SBA and the US Treasury, as to what criteria will be needed to be satisfied to meet the new requirements of the PPP#2.
  5. I will be working with the ADA in January 2021 as the PPP#2 develops and will be reporting back to you at that time. The ADA has been “off the charts” supporting Dentistry throughout this process. Your membership with the ADA is working for you!!  

Other Key Tax Provisions for Dentistry

  1. Employee Retention Tax Credit: Extended through July 1, 2021; We are waiting on further guidance as to how this work in 2021.
  2. COVID-Related Pay Tax Credits: Extended to March 31, 2021. These are the refundable payroll tax credits for Emergency Paid Leave and Emergency Family Medical Leave Pay that were set to expire on December 31. Please e mail Diane Nelson, CPA, MST at DNelson@schiffcpa.com for further guidance and help if needed.
  3. Charitable Giving Incentive Extended: One-year extension of the $300 “above the line deduction,” meaning you can take this deduction even if you are not using itemizing your deductions on your individual income tax return. Is now $600 if Married Filing Joint (MFJ). Please see note below on giving to the ALS Clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. Thank you!
  4. Flexible Spending Arrangement (FSA) Relief: Allows individuals to carry over any unused health and dependent care FSA benefits from 2020 into 2021 plan year.

Department of Health & Human Services (HHS)

Many of you received Phase 2 funding from the Department of Health & Human Services. Some of you, even received funding from HHS recently within their Phase 3 funding. As of today, we will have to report to the Department of HHS in January 2021 and again in July 2021 as to how you used these proceeds and what monies were spent on such. As soon as January 2021 begins for Small Business, the Department of HHS will be supplying us with further guidance as to what documents will be needed in order to gain full forgiveness. As of now, please save all documentation (Invoices, Canceled Checks and Credit Card Receipts) for any items you purchased that would qualify for PPE Equipment & Supplies. We will be sending out an updated e-mail with instructions, as soon as the requirements become apparent to us.  

2020 4th Quarter Estimated Payments due , January 15, 2021

During the last Quarter of 2020, we have met with most of our clients. During your 2020 year end meeting, we presented to you, two (2) scenarios with respect to your Tax Position as of December 31, 2020. Please review such, and please pay the 2020 4th Quarter Estimate based on the Column of your Tax Projection that states the PPP Loan will not be taxable. If you have any questions, please contact your Schiff Team Member on Monday, January 4, 2021.

Maryland – LLC’s , Sub S Corporations – Maryland MD 510 Payments due TODAY, December 31, 2020

Recently, the State of Maryland changed their tax laws as it relates, to the State of Maryland Taxes due from Pass Through entities, such as a Maryland LLC, Maryland Partnership and a Maryland Subchapter S Corporation. The new Tax Law, will allow you to pay your State Taxes through your entity, and receive a tax deduction. Please be sure to pay this Tax with Maryland Tax Form 510D. https://www.marylandtaxes.gov/forms/20_forms/510D.pdf. Please pay today, December 31, 2020, if you have not done so.

This only applies to Maryland Partnerships and Corporations, NOT SOLE PROPIETORSHIPS taxed as an LLC!

ALS Clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital Baltimore – Cindy Schiff

As you have gotten to know Cindy, life was not about her, but about mankind. There will be no better way to honor her life with a contribution to research of the horrible disease of ALS. Contributions in Cindy’s name can be mail to:


Hopkins ALS Clinical & Education Fund
c/o Lora Clawson, CRNP
JHOPC – Suite 5070A 
601 North Caroline Street
Baltimore MD 21287

Or , you can pay on line at >>

https://secure.jhu.edu/form/als?fbclid=IwAR3RvQ3xmUM0vdcXfrcxvOI1XF7h1k5j58ARe8iWPvqtUx38lWl6lyV4QfM

Special “THANKS” to each of you, that have made a Contribution to the ALS Clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore in honor of Cindy’s Name. I am so appreciative of each you and your generosity. The ALS Clinic in Baltimore, is amazed at the abundance of love as well!  My heart is filled with amazing warmth & comfort….Thank you!

ADCPA PODCAST on PPP Funds & Cindy Schiff & the ADCPA

As most of you know, the ADCPA produces a weekly PODCAST on Dental Practice Management as well as Dental Finance. The December 16th PODCAST was on >>>What Dentists Need to do to Qualify for a New PPP Loan in the Next Round of Stimulus as well as was dedicated to Cindy & her life. If you would like to listen to this Podcast, please click on the Hyper Link below. I am grateful for Art Wiederman, CPA (ADCPA Los Angeles CA) for dedicating the PODCAST to Cindy & her life.

https://blubrry.com/art_of_dental_finance/71634748/what-dentists-need-to-do-to-qualify-for-a-new-ppp-loan-in-the-next-round-of-stimulus/

Additional Coronavirus Response and Relief (ACRR)

This morning the text of the new Additional Coronavirus Response and Relief (ACRR) legislation was released. If the legislation is passed by Congress and signed into law, it will include the following items:

1.  PPP Deductibility – Expenses used to obtain loan forgiveness will be deductible.

2.  EIDL Grant taxability – The EIDL Grant (up to $10,000 received in April 2020) will be tax free and related expenses will be deductible.

3.  EIDL Grant impact – The EIDL Grant will no longer reduce PPP loan forgiveness. Under the CARES Act, if a practice received a $100,000 PPP and $10,000 EIDL, it would be eligible for $90,000 forgiveness and be left with a $10,000 PPP loan. That adjustment is being eliminated allowing for the potential to obtain full forgiveness.

4.  Simplified application – PPP loans of under $150,000 will be eligible for a one page simplified forgiveness application but still must retain documentation and meet the requirements of the program.

5.  2nd Round PPP – If your practice incurred a 25% or greater reduction in collections in any 2020 calendar quarter compared to 2019, it may be eligible for a 2nd PPP loan. Most practices should have incurred such a reduction for the 2nd quarter that includes April – June 2020. We need additional time and guidance to determine if there will be other limitations.

6.  Stimulus payments – Taxpayers with under $150,000 adjusted gross income (married filing joint) or $75,000 (single) will be eligible for an additional $600 stimulus payment or 2020 tax credit.

7.  Meals – Business meals provided by a restaurant paid in 2021 and 2022 will be 100% deductible but still require normal documentation including the business purpose, who attended, and what business was discussed. There is no change to business meals paid in 2020.

It is important to note that even if this legislation is passed without changes, it will take the Treasury Department, SBA, and IRS a few weeks or months to clarify some details. 

This is GREAT NEWS to all business owners! A early Christmas gift before Christmas!  :>)

Next Round of HHS Grant Relief Funds 12/16/20

Today, December 16, 2020, many of you should be receiving the next round of HHS Payments (Phase 3 Payments).  Please check your bank statement for they are ACH into your Business Checking Account. For those of you, that have had your 2020 year-end meeting with us, you may want to increase your Estimated Tax Payments due January 15, 2021, for these funds are taxable. Please contact your Schiff Team Member for any questions you may have. If your 2020 year-end meeting is coming up, we will need this info from you ASAP, so that we remain current.

Update – Phase 3 Dept HHS Provider Relief Grant (PRG)

I wanted to reach out to offer some insight into the HHS Phase III Funding Application that I emailed you on Friday October 23, 2020.

This 3rd round of HHS funding will first go to Dental Practices who have not received funding from HHS within the previous two (2) HHS phases. This would include Start Up Dental Practices as well as those Practices that were rejected or did not apply for Phase 1 or Phase 2 Funding. After all applications have been processed AND all entities who qualified for the 2% of net 2019 collection payment have in fact received their payments, there is a possibility of additional payments from HHS if there are monies left over. There are no guarantees.

At this time we do not know how much funding, if any, will be left over to be distributed to practices that have already received their 2% of Net 2019 Collections payment from HHS. We will have to wait and see.

If you are in need of your P & L for Q1 2020, Q2 2020 and/or Q1 2019 and/or Q1 2019, please reach out to your Schiff Team Member. We can also supply you with your 2019 Income Tax Return as well.

HHS Applications are due TONIGHT by Midnight!

As a reminder, Phase 3 for the Provider Relief Grant (PRG) under the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is still available up to 12 Midnight tonight. If you have not applied, please click on this URL:

https://www.hhs.gov/coronavirus/cares-act-provider-relief-fund/for-providers/index.html

If you are in need of Tax Returns and P & L’s, etc. from my office, please reach out to your Schiff Team Member ASAP

Schiff Dental Clients- HHS Phase 3 – Update October 23, 2020

HHS Grant Relief Fund – Phase 3

Yesterday, the HHS changed the rules yet again, to now include the loss of Gross Revenue during the Pandemic. As a result of this change, we are encouraging clients to file for the additional funding under Phase 3 of the Provider Relief Fund (PRF).

You can apply again, even if you already applied. You can apply if you are a “start up” Dental Practice (January through March 2020). You can apply if you did not receive the proper amount of funding under Phase2. Please keep in mind, these funds are currently taxable.

There will be reporting requirements in the future (July 2021) in order for you to substantiate the funding. If you cannot support the funding, the excess will have to be repaid back to HHS. What can you use the HHS Funding for, besides the loss of Revenue? Here is a list of expenses.

a. Supplies: Expenses paid for purchase of supplies used to prevent, prepare for, or respond to the coronavirus during the reporting period. Such items could include: personal protective equipment (PPE), hand sanitizer, or supplies for patient screening.

b. Equipment: Expenses paid for purchase of equipment used to prevent, prepare for, or respond to the coronavirus during the reporting period, such as ventilators, updates to HVAC systems, etc.                                                          

c. Information Technology (IT): Expenses paid for IT or interoperability systems to expand or preserve care delivery during the reporting period, such as electronic health record licensing fees, telehealth infrastructure, increased bandwidth, and teleworking to support remote workforce. 

d. Facilities: Expenses paid for facility-related costs used to prevent, prepare for, or respond to the coronavirus during the reporting period, such as lease or purchase of permanent or temporary structures, or to modify facilities to accommodate patient treatment practices revised due to coronavirus.

e. Other Healthcare Related Expenses: Any other actual expenses, not previously captured above, that were paid to prevent, prepare for, or respond to the coronavirus.

We are encouraging all clients, to start to maintain a list of Covid Expenses you have incurred within your practice between the period of March 15, 2020 and June 30, 2022.

For additional information on the HHS Phase 3, please click on the following links:

ADA News – October 22, 2020 – https://www.ada.org/en/publications/ada-news/2020-archive/october/hhs-provider-relief-fund-open-for-phase-3-applications?utm_source=DEC_DIQ+Morning+Briefing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CPS201022074&o_eid=5213J4648590B4Z&rdx.ident%5Bpull%5D=omeda%7C5213J4648590B4Z

What is the Provider Relief Fund? – https://www.hhs.gov/coronavirus/cares-act-provider-relief-fund/for-providers/index.html?language=es#what-is-the

HHS Webcast – November 2, 2020 – click here to register – https://webex.webcasts.com/starthere.jsp?ei=1392456&tp_key=eddc1773dc

ADA – FAQ’s – HHS – https://success.ada.org/~/media/CPS/Files/COVID/HHS_Provider_Relief_Fund_FAQ.pdf

HHS Client Assistance à If you have questions, please contact the HHS Provider Support Line at 1-866-569-3522 during the hours of operation from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. CT Monday-Friday.