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ADCPA | What You Should Know About Your Practice’s Finances

As the owner of your own dental practice, you’re most likely also responsible for the financial health of your practice. As the leader of your own business, this responsibility probably isn’t one that you would change, but it may be one that you can improve on. Here are a few ways that you can better understand your finances to help ensure your growth and continued success.

Do you Have a Strong Billing Strategy?

Managing the finances of your business means collecting payments from your patients and their insurance companies. Short of hiring an enforcer to collect payments like some kind of dental loan shark, a strong billing strategy can help you receive these payments in a timely and efficient manner. If you struggle to collect payment, take a look at what strategies you use and learn how to help improve the day-to-day functionality of your practice. A dental accountant may be able to help you create a more powerful billing strategy. 

How Are You Spending, and What Returns Are You Seeing?

By knowing this information about your practice finances, you’ll have a much clearer picture of your practice. From this knowledge, you can make more informed decisions about which expenditures continue to make sense, and which you could most likely cut back on without seeing a large dip in productivity. Understanding your practice’s finances and using that understanding to make better decisions is the main speciality of a dental CPA. If accounting and handling the finances of your practice isn’t your strong suit, our team is here to help.

Prepare For the Future, Whether it Holds Growth or Decline

You solve problems for your practice every day. This won’t change in the future, but you can ensure that you’re equipped to handle even the most difficult of problems by preparing for the future with your finances.

Setting aside a little money consistently can help you have a large fund when opportunities for growth pop up. This fund can also be used if you ever find yourself in an emergency. Either way, having a financial plan is essential for a thriving business and a stable financial future.

If you’re ready to take your practice to the next level, give our team of skilled accountants a call. We can help with more than just your taxes. Together, we can discuss the current financial health of your practice and devise a plan for growth and a more secure financial situation. Whatever your needs, our expertise is here to help your practice grow. 

Update – Phase 3 Dept HHS Provider Relief Grant (PRG)

I wanted to reach out to offer some insight into the HHS Phase III Funding Application that I emailed you on Friday October 23, 2020.

This 3rd round of HHS funding will first go to Dental Practices who have not received funding from HHS within the previous two (2) HHS phases. This would include Start Up Dental Practices as well as those Practices that were rejected or did not apply for Phase 1 or Phase 2 Funding. After all applications have been processed AND all entities who qualified for the 2% of net 2019 collection payment have in fact received their payments, there is a possibility of additional payments from HHS if there are monies left over. There are no guarantees.

At this time we do not know how much funding, if any, will be left over to be distributed to practices that have already received their 2% of Net 2019 Collections payment from HHS. We will have to wait and see.

If you are in need of your P & L for Q1 2020, Q2 2020 and/or Q1 2019 and/or Q1 2019, please reach out to your Schiff Team Member. We can also supply you with your 2019 Income Tax Return as well.

HHS Applications are due TONIGHT by Midnight!

As a reminder, Phase 3 for the Provider Relief Grant (PRG) under the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is still available up to 12 Midnight tonight. If you have not applied, please click on this URL:

https://www.hhs.gov/coronavirus/cares-act-provider-relief-fund/for-providers/index.html

If you are in need of Tax Returns and P & L’s, etc. from my office, please reach out to your Schiff Team Member ASAP

Dental Accountant Near Me | Our Dental Accountants Can Help Your Practice Grow

As a practicing dental professional and business owner, you have a lot of your plate. With so many competing demands, you may find you struggle to find time for proper accounting. One consideration that can help streamline your practice and give you more time for other priorities is hiring a professional dental accountant. Our team of experts at ADCPA can provide you with the expertise and knowledge you need when you don’t have time to do your own accounting. Of course, in addition to the time saving benefits, there are many reasons why a dentist might need a dental accountant, including:

  • Stay Compliant With Tax Laws. Accounting professionals will keep up on the trends in your industry. Our dental accountant will make sure your practice doesn’t end up paying more annual taxes than you need to. Tax laws are always evolving, and staying compliant with all the various changes can be difficult if you aren’t a dental accountant.
  • Assisting With Retirement Planning. Whether you’re in the first year of your practice or you can see retirement within the next couple years, it’s always a good idea to think about retirement and planning for the future. Having an accountant can help you set goals and plan for your future and the future of your practice.
  • Opportunities to Grow. Eventually you’ll want to invest in new equipment for your practice. As your practice grows, you may consider moving to a bigger office. Our dental accountant will look at your financials and advise you to make the best decision for your practice.

When it comes to running a successful practice, managing your finances is a key concern. If you’re looking to optimize how you spend your time and resources, consider speaking with a member of our team. Our dental accountants can offer you the expertise and support you need to manage this all-important area of your business so you can focus more on patient care and even take your practice to the next level. If you’re ready to learn more about how our team can help you, schedule your consultation today.

Academy of Dental CPAs | What to Consider When Selling Your Dental Practice

Selling your dental practice can be quite an intimidating prospect. You may have numerous questions, such as: How do you make sure the practice you’ve worked so hard to create, or the team you’ve come to love is properly taken care of after you’re gone? When is it too soon to make a decision, or has the time frame already passed? The good news is, the important decisions you’ll face when attempting to sell a practice don’t have to be faced alone. Our team is here to help you with expert guidance and knowledge because we’ve helped many dentists just like you create successful transitions. With that in mind, here are a few things to consider when it comes time to sell.

Determine a “why”

It is important to understand why you’re considering selling the practice in the first place. Is the practice underperforming financially? Has it become too much work? It could also be more of a personal reason. Have you lost passion for the business? Are you considering retirement? Knowing why you’re selling is an important first step, especially if it is something that can be turned around or improved. Occasionally understanding the why can change your initial plans before they go too far.

Timing is key

If you’ve fully committed to selling your dental practice and are happy with your “why”, it’s important to look at the timing. Do you have a hard sell-by date? Or will you take your time? Knowing how you want to time each step is an important part of the selling process, and can make or break a deal in the end. Having a date to sell by can increase pressure, and affect the results of the sale. Taking time and assessing when the best time to sell is can take more time, but may be more rewarding in the end. 

Consider partnering with outside experts

Personally handling every aspect of the sale of a dental practice can be a full-time job itself, and adding it onto a still functioning dental practice can be an overwhelming situation. Using partners or contacting outside help can make the situation go much more smoothly. It may be helpful to consider contacting a broker to help with closing, or a marketing agency to help you find the right buyer for your dental practice. Adding these resources can save you time and help with your totals in the end.

There are many factors to consider when selling a dental practice. Make sure you take the time to think through all areas that may affect your situation. An important decision like closing a dental practice can have many repercussions and eliminating as many variables as possible will only make for a better sale in the end. If you’re looking for expert assistance in the sale of your business, call our team today and see how we can help you.

Schiff Dental Clients- HHS Phase 3 – Update October 23, 2020

HHS Grant Relief Fund – Phase 3

Yesterday, the HHS changed the rules yet again, to now include the loss of Gross Revenue during the Pandemic. As a result of this change, we are encouraging clients to file for the additional funding under Phase 3 of the Provider Relief Fund (PRF).

You can apply again, even if you already applied. You can apply if you are a “start up” Dental Practice (January through March 2020). You can apply if you did not receive the proper amount of funding under Phase2. Please keep in mind, these funds are currently taxable.

There will be reporting requirements in the future (July 2021) in order for you to substantiate the funding. If you cannot support the funding, the excess will have to be repaid back to HHS. What can you use the HHS Funding for, besides the loss of Revenue? Here is a list of expenses.

a. Supplies: Expenses paid for purchase of supplies used to prevent, prepare for, or respond to the coronavirus during the reporting period. Such items could include: personal protective equipment (PPE), hand sanitizer, or supplies for patient screening.

b. Equipment: Expenses paid for purchase of equipment used to prevent, prepare for, or respond to the coronavirus during the reporting period, such as ventilators, updates to HVAC systems, etc.                                                          

c. Information Technology (IT): Expenses paid for IT or interoperability systems to expand or preserve care delivery during the reporting period, such as electronic health record licensing fees, telehealth infrastructure, increased bandwidth, and teleworking to support remote workforce. 

d. Facilities: Expenses paid for facility-related costs used to prevent, prepare for, or respond to the coronavirus during the reporting period, such as lease or purchase of permanent or temporary structures, or to modify facilities to accommodate patient treatment practices revised due to coronavirus.

e. Other Healthcare Related Expenses: Any other actual expenses, not previously captured above, that were paid to prevent, prepare for, or respond to the coronavirus.

We are encouraging all clients, to start to maintain a list of Covid Expenses you have incurred within your practice between the period of March 15, 2020 and June 30, 2022.

For additional information on the HHS Phase 3, please click on the following links:

ADA News – October 22, 2020 – https://www.ada.org/en/publications/ada-news/2020-archive/october/hhs-provider-relief-fund-open-for-phase-3-applications?utm_source=DEC_DIQ+Morning+Briefing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CPS201022074&o_eid=5213J4648590B4Z&rdx.ident%5Bpull%5D=omeda%7C5213J4648590B4Z

What is the Provider Relief Fund? – https://www.hhs.gov/coronavirus/cares-act-provider-relief-fund/for-providers/index.html?language=es#what-is-the

HHS Webcast – November 2, 2020 – click here to register – https://webex.webcasts.com/starthere.jsp?ei=1392456&tp_key=eddc1773dc

ADA – FAQ’s – HHS – https://success.ada.org/~/media/CPS/Files/COVID/HHS_Provider_Relief_Fund_FAQ.pdf

HHS Client Assistance à If you have questions, please contact the HHS Provider Support Line at 1-866-569-3522 during the hours of operation from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. CT Monday-Friday.

ADCPA | How to Be a More Effective Practice Leader

At the core of any thriving dental practice is an effective and powerful leader. When a team has direction, intention, and a clearly articulated purpose, they’re able to achieve the desired goals. With that in mind, it’s important to be the best leader you can possibly be. Whether you’re opening a brand new practice for the first time, or have been leading a team for multiple years, there’s always room to grow. 

Effective leaders create a compelling direction. 

People work best when they have a set of goals they’re working to achieve, and your team is no different. When communicating, make sure you set concrete and attainable goals for your employees. Make sure they understand why these goals are important, not only to the success of your practice, but to their own personal success. As they work to achieve these goals, it’s important to monitor their progress in order to make sure everyone is performing at an optimal level. 

Effective leaders create lasting solutions. 

When an issue inevitably arises in your practice, how will you address it? If your solution is a temporary fix, it will only lead to more headaches and struggles for your team later. The difference between a leader and a follower is that a leader won’t settle for a quick fix when they know their team is capable of more. Just like in dentistry, it’s important to treat the root cause of the issue, rather than just the symptoms themselves. 

Effective leaders know when to be flexible, and when not to be. 

Many new leaders make one of two mistakes. They either allow their team to walk all over them, giving in to any demand or complaint, or they take the opposite approach and refuse to change anything. Both are disastrous and will derail the success of your practice. There are times when you will have to go with the flow, making adjustments based on what your team and your practice needs. These changes can affect everything from your systems to your leadership style. However, there are also times when you must push your team and your practice forward. 

Effective leaders understand when they need support. 

Oftentimes, leaders believe that they need to handle it all themselves, having the weight of the entire practice on their shoulders. This isn’t the case. When you lack the time or expertise to complete a project at a high level, it’s more than acceptable to ask for outside help. If your accounting skills are holding you back from a greater level of success, our team is here to help you with expert accounting services. We know how to leverage your finances to help you achieve your goals and stay on track. Contact our team for more information. 

Dental CPAs | Can Your Practice Weather a Financial Storm?

One of the core financial planning tenets is the need to establish an emergency fund. Having a financial safety net is essential, especially today when the economy and the world is facing so much uncertainty. Should an unexpected natural disaster, staffing upset, or other unplanned event interrupt the flow of business to your practice, are you prepared to ride out the difficulty?

Defining a financial emergency

The criteria for what constitutes a financial storm or emergency will be defined differently based on each practitioner’s unique circumstances. A large, financially stable practice may barely notice if several staff members suddenly quit. That same scenario could wreak havoc on a small practice. Of course, a fire, flood or other damaging event is likely to be disastrous for any practice if you are unable to see patients and generate revenue for an extended period of time. This is why having a business emergency fund in place is so vital: to help you carry on, make payroll and pay bills until things return to normalcy.

How much should you set aside?

Most financial advisors recommend saving between 3 and 6 months salary in individual emergency funds. However, these amounts will likely be insufficient for even a small dental practice. There are a number of variables, but here are some questions to consider as you calculate what makes sense for you:

·         What are your insurance limits?

·         How much time will you wait for insurance claims to be processed?

·         What risks are not covered by insurance?

·         How long can your practice survive if you are unable to generate revenue?

·         What would it cost to arrange coverage for staff members who quit unexpectedly?

·         How much are replacement costs for essential equipment that is damaged and inoperable?

Knowing where to start

Many people don’t save for a rainy day because they don’t anticipate financial emergencies until it’s too late to prepare. If you have not begun shoring up your practice against financial storms, now is the time to begin putting a plan in place. An excellent place to start is by scheduling a consultation with our office. We can assess your assets and your risk, and identify vital next steps to ensure your practice is financially secure, no matter what the future holds.

Academy of Dental CPAs | Streamline Your Practice with Better Accounting

As a dental practice owner, you have a lot on your plate. From seeing patients and managing your staff to staying abreast of trends in your profession, there is not a lot of extra time for balancing the books. Yet, profitability is always a priority, so how can you streamline your practice and create better efficiencies so that your practice can truly thrive? One of the best ways is to hire an accountant who specializes in your area of expertise. A dental-industry accountant can offer the following advantages:

1.   Keeping you abreast of industry trends. Specialized accounting professionals will be mindful of trends that impact your profitability. This means you’ll enjoy practice-specific tax advice suited to your practice size and location so you don’t end up paying more annual tax than you should. A specialized accountant is also aware of evolving tax laws and can help you stay compliant and avoid unwanted audits.

2.   Serving as a sounding board. At some point you will probably consider investing in new equipment or perhaps consider an office expansion. Staying competitive requires looking for opportunities to grow. A specialized accountant can consult with you and help you look at various pros and cons prior to making a financial commitment. Having a sounding board for important monetary decisions can help you avoid a poor investment that could cost you in the long run.

3.   Assisting with retirement planning. Even if you see retirement as a long way off, planning ahead can make the difference in terms of your future nest egg. Having a CPA who understands your goals, your business and your target retirement age can free you up to focus on other things, like caring for patients.

4.   Spotlighting best practices. When you engage the services of a dental-industry accountant, you can take advantage of all of their industry know-how. They can share lessons learned from similar practices, connect you with other professionals in related industries, and provide trusted advice about important business decisions.

When you think about streamlining your practice, hiring an accountant may not be the first decision that comes to mind. But you may not realize how much of your time and energy is spent on the myriad of financial decisions and concerns that are inherent in running any small business. A skilled dental-industry accountant may be just the support you need to take your practice to the next level of success. 

To learn more about how our small-business accounting services can help your dental practice thrive, contact us today for more information.

ADCPA | How to Avoid Becoming a Victim of Employee Embezzlement

Let’s face it: As a practice owner, you have many responsibilities. Juggling the demands of seeing patients, overseeing staff, and monitoring financial transactions can be overwhelming. That’s why putting safeguards and internal controls in place is so important, to help you avoid the risk of theft from employees. While it may be hard to imagine that the smiling face you hired to greet visitors could be stealing from you, that kind of naivety has cost doctors like you thousands of dollars in annual revenue. In fact, according to the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE), as many as 60% of dentists will eventually become victims of embezzlement. It can be difficult to prevent employee theft, but educating yourself now and putting processes in place to better secure your financial picture can help minimize the possibility of it happening to you. Here are some tips to get you started.

Know Who You’re Hiring
It’s not enough to select a new employee based on their resume or personality. Your new hire will be handling confidential information such as insurance claims, patient data, and checking account numbers, so anyone whom you consider bringing on board should undergo a professional background check. You should also request references, including contact information from their previous employer. 

Learn as Much as (and More Than) Your Employees
Over time, employees see which patients pay with cash, who writes checks, the average daily and weekly deposit amounts, and how much money comes in from insurance companies. This is information you should be familiar with as well. Require that each employee log these details in your accounting software and ask your accountant to help you create a program that includes a check and balance system with daily opening and closing reports. That way, either you or your accountant can run and analyze these reports—never an employee.

Delegate Shared Responsibilities
No individual in your office should control any financial process from start to finish, so make sure you establish and implement a team approach to these tasks. This will let you know who recorded which transactions and create a higher degree of accountability among your staff.

Look for Common Red Flags

You should always keep an eye out for common indicators that an employee might be stealing from the practice. Pay attention if someone on your team is suddenly spending beyond their means, is always the first in the building and last to leave, or is overly protective or secretive of their work. 

Schedule an Outside Audit 

Serious financial damage can add up quickly if you’re the victim of embezzlement, so it’s important to periodically hire an outside accountant to review your finances and look for irregularities. He or she will be able to monitor your employees’ work and catch errors, mistakes and theft.

If you notice that the numbers in your practice aren’t adding up, it’s best not to tell anyone on your staff since the suspect could find out and destroy incriminating evidence.  Instead, talk to a trusted CPA first so they can put a fool-proof process in place to catch your thief and get your money back in your business where it belongs. If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment to learn more, contact us today.